Fast Facts

  • Main Conference Dates: July 6 – 9
  • Theme: Beyond Diversity and Inclusion: Equity and Fairness in International Business
  • Location: Miami, Florida, USA
  • Program Chair: Andrew Delios, National University of Singapore (2022chair@nus.edu.sg)
  • Submission Deadline: January 10, 2022

Beyond Diversity and Inclusion:
Equity and Fairness in International Business

Diversity and Inclusion have been at the forefront of conversations in academics and business for several years. Diversity and Inclusion is a constituent element in the United Nation’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). Indeed, SDG itself has become an essential part of contemporary business. Yet, if we go beyond SDG, diversity and inclusion, we arrive at an overarching global trend, which is the pursuit of Equity and Fairness in International Business.

Equity means being fair and impartial. Fairness means just and equitable treatment, without prejudice. When we consider these reciprocal definitions of Equity and Fairness, we can see how these concepts align well with important contemporary issues as connected to practice, education, and research in International Business.

Indeed, we are in an age where it is incumbent on IB scholars to consider explicitly how Equity and Fairness tie into their scholarship and into the communications of their scholarship to educators, students, practitioners, and public policy makers. Examples of where Equity and Fairness apply to International Business are in the following.

  • Equity and Fairness in post-pandemic Globalization. There has been much discussion of the state of Globalization. How has the pandemic affected the social, political, and cultural underlays of Globalization particularly as it connects to equity and fairness in the patterns, benefits and returns from globalization?
    .
  • Equity and Fairness in research methodologies and epistemologies. We have had long standing debates about the balance between quantified empirical work and qualitative work in international business, as well represented in recent reflections on the state of International Business. How does equity and fairness affect international business research methodologies and how do international business research methodologies impact equity and fairness?
    .
  • Equity and Fairness for foreign firms in global competition. The liability of foreignness concept richly illustrates the asymmetric competitive challenges of foreign firms in host country markets. Do we have truly equitable global competition? Are foreign firms and local firms competing fairly? Can we expect regulatory, cultural, or information-based impediments to be overcome by foreign firms to allow for more equitable competition?
    .
  • Equity and Fairness in representation of interests of all stakeholders. Much of the work on sustainability and CSR connect to providing equal voice to all a firm’s stakeholders. What is the role of corporate diplomats and regional and country headquarters for managing such tensions, especially where we see an increasing divergence across geographies in expectations of appropriate corporate behavior.
    .
  • Equity and Fairness in the leadership of MNCs. Although substantial progress has been made in MNCs in terms of reducing gender-based discrimination, among other types of discrimination, we still see pockets of geography where gender bias is embarrassingly prominent. How will MNCs manage to develop, particularly MNCs from newly emergent nations, organizational systems that foster leaders and cultures that support equity and fairness? Should they even be concerned with so doing?
    .
  • Equity and Fairness in competition across nations. Divergent views on how economies can be led and governed lead to different conceptions of appropriate levels of cooperation between the state and its private firms. How can various models of state participation and capitalism be harmonized to lead to fair and equitable competition in international markets?
    .
  • Equity and Fairness in our evaluation of economic and political models. How can IB scholars grounded in alternative paradigms of political, economic, and business analysis develop and execute bias-free and judgement-free research on the alternative ways of organizing that exist across world regions?

These and other topics hold the potential to disrupt the practice of International Business, while also creating the opportunity to learn and advance theories of International Business. Clearly, businesses and academics across the world cannot ignore the importance of Equity and Fairness. Consequently, the AIB community needs to explicitly consider how these trends will impact (i) how we organize effectively as a community and within our respective institutions, (ii) how we train and educate ourselves as scholars concerned with present-day matters of importance, and (iii) how we can continue to provide value to organizations that compete in the International Business sphere.

The AIB 2022 conference theme highlights the importance of developing deep and substantive considerations of and insights into Equity and Fairness. The local track, Top Management Teams and Corporate Governance, and their Formal and Informal Institutional Contexts, aligns well with this important global trend.

To learn more, we invite you to view the following video introduction to this exciting theme by 2022 Program Chair Andrew Delios.

Beyond Diversity and Inclusion:
Equity and Fairness in International Business

Diversity and Inclusion have been at the forefront of conversations in academics and business for several years. Diversity and Inclusion is a constituent element in the United Nation’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SGD). Indeed, SGD itself has become an essential part of contemporary business. Yet, if we go beyond SDG, diversity and inclusion, we arrive at an overarching global trend, which is the pursuit of Equity and Fairness in International Business.

Equity means being fair and impartial. Fairness means just and equitable treatment, without prejudice. When we consider these reciprocal definitions of Equity and Fairness, we can see how these concepts align well with important contemporary issues as connected to practice, education, and research in International Business.

Indeed, we are in an age where it is incumbent on IB scholars to consider explicitly how Equity and Fairness tie into their scholarship and into the communications of their scholarship to educators, students, practitioners, and public policy makers. Examples of where Equity and Fairness apply to International Business are in the following.

  • Equity and Fairness in post-pandemic Globalization. There has been much discussion of the state of Globalization. How has the pandemic affected the social, political, and cultural underlays of Globalization particularly as it connects to equity and fairness in the patterns, benefits and returns from globalization?
    .
  • Equity and Fairness in research methodologies and epistemologies. We have had long standing debates about the balance between quantified empirical work and qualitative work in international business, as well represented in recent reflections on the state of International Business. How does equity and fairness affect international business research methodologies and how do international business research methodologies impact equity and fairness?
    .
  • Equity and Fairness for foreign firms in global competition. The liability of foreignness concept richly illustrates the asymmetric competitive challenges of foreign firms in host country markets. Do we have truly equitable global competition? Are foreign firms and local firms competing fairly? Can we expect regulatory, cultural, or information-based impediments to be overcome by foreign firms to allow for more equitable competition?
    .
  • Equity and Fairness in representation of interests of all stakeholders. Much of the work on sustainability and CSR connect to providing equal voice to all a firm’s stakeholders. What is the role of corporate diplomats and regional and country headquarters for managing such tensions, especially where we see an increasing divergence across geographies in expectations of appropriate corporate behavior.
    .
  • Equity and Fairness in the leadership of MNCs. Although substantial progress has been made in MNCs in terms of reducing gender-based discrimination, among other types of discrimination, we still see pockets of geography where gender bias is embarrassingly prominent. How will MNCs manage to develop, particularly MNCs from newly emergent nations, organizational systems that foster leaders and cultures that support equity and fairness? Should they even be concerned with so doing?
    .
  • Equity and Fairness in competition across nations. Divergent views on how economies can be led and governed lead to different conceptions of appropriate levels of cooperation between the state and its private firms. How can various models of state participation and capitalism be harmonized to lead to fair and equitable competition in international markets?
    .
  • Equity and Fairness in our evaluation of economic and political models. How can IB scholars grounded in alternative paradigms of political, economic, and business analysis develop and execute bias-free and judgement-free research on the alternative ways of organizing that exist across world regions?

These and other topics hold the potential to disrupt the practice of International Business, while also creating the opportunity to learn and advance theories of International Business. Clearly, businesses and academics across the world cannot ignore the importance of Equity and Fairness. Consequently, the AIB community needs to explicitly consider how these trends will impact (i) how we organize effectively as a community and within our respective institutions, (ii) how we train and educate ourselves as scholars concerned with present-day matters of importance, and (iii) how we can continue to provide value to organizations that compete in the International Business sphere.

The AIB 2022 conference theme highlights the importance of developing deep and substantive considerations of and insights into Equity and Fairness. The local track, Top Management Teams and Corporate Governance, and their Formal and Informal Institutional Contexts, aligns well with this important global trend.

To learn more, we invite you to view a video introduction to this exciting theme by 2022 Program Chair Andrew Delios.

Conference Tracks

1. Internationalization processes and international entrepreneurship

Track Co-Chairs:
Jing Zhang, Old Dominion University, j3zhang@odu.edu
Maria Elo, University of Southern Denmark, melo@sam.sdu.dk

Rapidly internationalizing SMEs compete and cooperate with large MNEs in the global market. This track seeks contributions that examine the internationalization process-and its fairness-for different kinds of firms, whether small and entrepreneurial firms, established multinationals, or latecomer MNEs from emerging markets. It covers contributions that focus on the characteristics of the process, whether gradual, rapid or leapfrogging, increasing or decreasing, as well as the various kinds of human, financial and political resources firms draw on in their internationalization. It can also cover contributions that examine diversity and inclusion in entrepreneurship, including different kind of entrepreneurs based on gender, race, origin, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, location, etc.

Keywords: Internationalization process; Entry modes; Exporting; Gradual internationalization; Rapid internationalization; Early internationalization; Internationalization and performance; De-internationalization; Re-internationalization; International entrepreneurship; Migrant entrepreneurship, Transnational entrepreneurship, Diaspora entrepreneurship, Returnee entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurial networks; SME exporters; International new ventures; Born-global firms

2. International marketing strategy and consumer behavior

Track Co-Chairs:
Nandini Nim, University of Texas at El Paso, nnim@utep.edu
Suparna Chakraborty, University of San Francisco, schakraborty2@usfca.edu

International marketing field is transforming rapidly under the influences of digitalization, technological advances, sustainability pressures, regulatory restrictions, an expanded geographic scope, and global marketing ecosystems. How do international marketing managers cope with, or even thrive under such challenges? How do consumers respond to these challenges and changes? Succeeding in ever more complex, interconnected and at the same time fragmented consumer markets requires an in-depth understanding of cross-national and crosscultural similarities/differences, as well as how these similarities/differences affect firms and their customers. This track seeks contributions from both international marketing strategy and consumer behavior sub-field within international marketing.

Keywords: Cross-cultural marketing; Advertising; Pricing; Marketing channels; Distribution channels; Products/services; Standardization/Adaptation; Brand management; Consumer behavior; Customer relationships; Customer Experience; Cross-cultural consumer behavior; Country-of-origin effects; Consumer animosity; Consumer well-being; Country-of-origin effects; Digital marketing; Social media marketing; Global retailing; Professional services marketing; B2B marketing; Relationship marketing; Technology-driven marketing or Technology marketing; Marketing to governments; Market targeting; Segmentation

3. Finance, accounting, and corporate governance

Track Co-Chairs:
Christina Mühr, WU Vienna Institute for International Business, christina.muehr@wu.ac.at
Anna Grosman, Loughborough University London, A.Grosman@lboro.ac.uk

The track emphasizes investment and financing choices, financial and corporate reporting, and risk management in multinational firms. Firms utilize various governance approaches and allocate decision-making to maximize organizational value while following financial reporting requirements of various nations. Corporate governance encompasses varying levels of internal and external oversight – board structures, compensation practices, ownership patterns, shareholder activism efforts, and disclosure choices across firms and national markets. We invite contributions on international finance and accounting, sustainable finance, MNE management, and corporate governance practices in an international context. We welcome novel research on the determinants of governance practices such as legal, financial, and political institutions, and their influences on performance outcomes, accounting standards, financial reporting quality, tax planning practices, financial risk management practices, CSR practices, bank lending, capital market development, venture capital development, and mergers and acquisitions. We also welcome submissions that address the influences of international investors on firm strategies, such as international private equity, sovereign wealth funds, international venture capital, international hedge funds, and international crowdfunding. In terms of the strategies and practices international investors follow and disseminate, papers could, for instance, address ownership changes or continuity, the limits of ownership and property rights, location-specific financial advantages, and the pursuit of sustainable practices in target firms.

Keywords: International finance and taxation; Transfer pricing; Corporate malfeasance; Accounting standards and conventions; Non-financial accounting standards; Non-financial reporting standards; International financial reporting; Valuation; Capital structure; Financial risk management; Macroeconomic risk management; Global risks; Exchange rate exposure; International financial integration; International cross-listing; Ownership structure; Institutional investors; State ownership; Family ownership; Shareholder activism; Business groups; Board diversity; Board processes, and effectiveness; Directorship interlocks; CEO turnover; CEO-board dynamics; Firm-stakeholder relationships; Stakeholder activism; Shareholder rights protections; Management compensation; Institutional investors; Mutual funds; Pension funds; International private equity; Sovereign wealth funds; International venture capital; International hedge funds; International crowdfunding; Sustainable finance; fintech

4. Global strategy, organization, and value chains  

Track Co-Chairs:
Stephanie Wang, Indiana University, slwang@indiana.edu
Anna Lamin, Northeastern University, a.lamin@northeastern.edu

MNEs are profoundly adjusting their strategies and configurations to leverage the opportunities of globalization, and, meanwhile, address the complexity from skepticism of globalization. As firms internationalize, they encounter new situations that present both opportunities and constraints for learning and value creation. Managing and harnessing the complexity of diverse settings across countries is crucial to the success of the global firm. Relevant topics for the track include, but are not limited to, international expansion, cross-border mergers and acquisitions, location strategy, entry mode decisions, outsourcing and offshoring decisions (and their reversal), the management, coordination, and governance of global value chains, as well as the development of MNEs’ organizational capabilities and performance.

Keywords: Global value chains; Global production networks; Global operations; Global sourcing; Outsourcing; Offshoring; Geography of IB activities; Relocation of production; Reshoring; Backshoring; Globalization of services; Global strategy; Growth strategies; Competitive strategy; Mergers and acquisitions; Joint ventures and alliances; Location strategy; Parent-subsidiary relationships; Foreign subsidiary management; MNE performance; Organizational learning; Organizational culture; Boundary spanning; Organizational change and development; Organizational structure; Organization of international operations; Organizational capabilities

5. International HRM, global leadership and cross-cultural management

Track Co-Chairs:
Cordula Barzantny, Toulouse Business School, c.barzantny@tbs-education.fr
Pingping Fu, The University of Nottingham, Pingping.Fu@nottingham.edu.cn

This track encompasses papers dealing with global leadership, effective multicultural teams, cross-cultural management, global talent management and cultural diversity which are all vital to the management of human resources within the multinational firm. This track also includes papers dealing with a range of HR activities from recruitment and selection to training, performance management, compensation, retention as well as leadership development, and managing multicultural teams. It also covers various international organizational behavior topics and such as the positive and negative effects of diversity for individuals, teams, and organizations, and issues related to cross-cultural management and global mobility. In addition, the track includes papers that address grand societal challenges (e.g., global migration and refugees) and the peoplerelated and cultural implications for the multinational firm with responsible managers and fair organization.

Keywords: Cross-cultural management; International human resource management; Global leadership; Crosscultural leadership; Cosmopolitans; Global mindset; Expatriate management; Talent management; Training and development; Retention; Selection; Performance appraisal; Compensation; Leadership development; Global staffing; International mobility; Education and international careers; Cultural diversity; Cross-cultural communication; Cross-cultural adjustment; Multicultural teams; Virtual teams; Intercultural competence; Cultural intelligence; Bicultural and multicultural identity; International migration; Returnees; Diasporans; Work-family issues; Cross-cultural values and practices; Local compliance; Cultural synergy; Ethics across cultures; Disabilities

6. Gender and diversity 

Track Co-Chairs:
Linn Zhang, Loughborough University London, l.e.zhang@lboro.ac.uk
June Lee, University of San Francisco, june.lee@usfca.edu

Diversity significantly impacts how firms conduct business across borders and manage multinationals and their employees. For example, different societies and organizations vary in terms of expected gender roles, their acceptance of homosexuality and non-traditional gender roles. These issues are often compounded by other aspects of diversity, such as race, ethnicity, physical abilities, language, class, or religion. The track invites papers that advance our understanding of the role of all aspects of diversity across all domains of IB, including leadership, ethics, finance, marketing, risk management, firm performance, corporate governance, firm internationalization, and strategic management.

Keywords: Diversity; Race; Ethnicity; Gender; Gender roles; Gender egalitarianism; Gender-based leadership differences; Gender and internationalization; Women in the multinational organization; Gender and international trade; Sex trafficking; LGBTQ and transgender issues; Gender entrepreneurship; Gender in the global south; race and gender in contexts of crises; Intersectionality of gender, race and class (and other forms of difference); Inequalities; Gender equality policies and practices; Gender relations at workplaces; New forms of masculinities; Gendered identities; Gendered networks; Gendered participation; Gendered ageism; Gendered mobilities; Workplace discrimination; Workplace inclusiveness; Gender fatigue, backlash and resistance to gender equality; Men and masculinities in innovation;

7. Teaching and education

Track Co-Chairs:
Ausrine Silenskyte, University of Vaasa, ausrine.silenskyte@uwasa.fi
Iris Berdrow, Bentley University, IBERDROW@bentley.edu

The main objectives of this track are facilitating development and sharing of best teaching practices, providing a forum for teaching-related knowledge sharing, and promoting research on teaching and education that showcases the importance of IB courses in business school curricula. This track addresses IB teaching at every level: undergraduate, graduate, MBA, and executive and covers all aspects of teaching IB, including student engagement, motivation, learning outcomes, and classroom diversity. Specifically, it focuses on the use of different tools and pedagogies such as experiential learning, cases, simulations, role-play, and various forms of multimedia to enhance IB teaching. To this end, this track invites submissions of scholarly papers, interactive session proposals and panels that stimulate teaching innovation and promote best practices in IB teaching.

In relation to the general theme of the AIB 2022, we are especially welcoming contributions discussing issues of fairness, equity and equality, as well as diversity and inclusion in IB education. More specifically, there are four research areas that the track would like to uplift. First, teaching practices needed to ensure: fairness in the classroom; development of inclusive mind-sets; and incorporation of equity and fairness perspectives in teaching IB theories and frameworks. Second, pedagogical tools that support: utilization of student diversity; handling diversity of perspectives and views in the classroom; and ensuring diversity of materials and examples. Third, development of faculty skills that support: teacher interactions with diverse students ensuring inclusion and elimination of biases in the class; enhancing interactions and learnings among diverse students; appropriate communication (e.g., using inclusive gender pronouns, using expressions that are acceptable within different contexts, cultures, and universally); and handling students and colleagues with different physical and mental abilities. Fourth, fair and equitable assessment of students, faculty, and institutions. For instance, best practices for equity and fairness in formative and normative assessment of students; the ways in which assessment of learning outcomes incorporates diverse perspectives; challenges in promoting equity and fairness in IB educational institutions, and alike.

Keywords: Experiential learning; Developing an IB curriculum; Internationalizing the business school; Internationalizing the curriculum; Cross-cultural classrooms; Case teaching; Executive education; Role of international experience; Simulations and role-playing; Blended learning; Hybrid teaching; Multimedia in IB teaching; IB teaching tools; Management of IB education; Management of educational markets; Competences for teaching IB; Future of IB education, diversity, equity and inclusion in IB teaching IB and education.

8. Research methods

Track Co-Chairs:
Ursula F. Ott, Nottingham Trent University, ursula.ott@ntu.ac.uk
Emmanuella Plakoyiannaki, University of Vienna, emmanuella.plakoyiannaki@univie.ac.at

High-quality and innovative research methods are at the heart of academic scholarship. Thus, developing, challenging, and improving methodological best practice is crucial to our relevance, credibility and growth as a discipline. This track aims not only to recognize and highlight outstanding use of innovative and nontraditional methodological approaches to investigate pertinent International Business (IB) phenomena but also seeks to showcase rigorous, trustworthy and transparent use of methods. It seeks to question methodological conventions in IB and promote cutting-edge developments in mixed-methods, qualitative and quantitative methodological approaches. Areas that papers might cover include: What methods can we develop to address new challenges in IB? How can we adapt more traditional methods for today’s research challenges? How can we account for the dynamism and temporality of IB phenomena? How can we contextualize IB theory and explanation? How can we rethink the balance between “thick” description and generalizability? How does earlier research stand up to analysis with more recent methods? How can we ensure transparency and trustworthiness of our data, research process and theorizing?

Keywords: Research methodology; Mixed methods; Qualitative research; Quantitative research; Ethnography; Interviews; Surveys; Experiments, Triangulation, Analytical rigor, Methodological rigor; Meta-analysis; Interdisciplinary research; Methodological innovation; Equivalence; Reliability; Transparency; Replicability

9. Emerging markets and emerging market MNEs

Track Co-Chairs:
Tanvi Kothari, San Jose State University, tanvi.kothari@sjsu.edu
Nila Wiese, University of Puget Sound, nwiese@pugetsound.edu

This track welcomes papers that explore novel issues of doing business in emerging markets (EMs), such as research on non-market strategies, new business models, government-private sector cooperation, and various forms of partnerships between MNCs and emerging market firms. We encourage papers that clarify the uniqueness and evolution of EM firms (e.g., are they still emerging); and that explore foreign direct investment trends, internationalization and other strategies, and competitive dynamics of EM firms. Papers that address contemporary questions such as the effects of a post-pandemic world on the role and competitiveness of EM firms, and strategies and approaches pursued by EM firms to address issues of diversity, inclusion, and sustainability. Given the evolving role of EMNEs and the born global firms in the growth of emerging markets, we encourage submissions focusing on these firms’ transitions from a culture of incremental innovation to a culture of breakthrough innovation. We strongly welcome papers that explore under-researched emerging markets – e.g., in MENA, Asia, or Latin America. We also invite well-articulated theoretical papers that can advance thinking in these areas, or that enhance understanding of the impact of, and EM firms’ responses to, important global trends.

Keywords: Emerging markets; Emerging market opportunities; Transition economies; Socialism; Capitalism; Colonialism; Economic development; Comparative and competitive advantages; Emerging market institutional environment; Foreign versus indigenous MNEs; State-owned enterprises in emerging markets; Family conglomerates; Privatization; Emerging market firm; Theory of EMNE, Internationalization of EMNEs, EMNEs’ diversity and inclusion strategies, EMNEs and SDGs

10. MNE state relations and international business policy

Track Co-Chairs:
Jing Li, Simon Fraser University, jingli@sfu.ca
Larissa Marchiori Pacheco, Northeastern University, l.marchioripacheco@northeastern.edu

What is the role of business in politics, government, and society? How does global and domestic political uncertainty affect MNEs? With political systems and ideologies in flux, populism on the rise, trade deals being altered or discarded, and the US-China rivalry more intensified, the current situation has given rise to complex political, social, and business challenges, making these questions ever more salient. What strategies and tactics can MNEs adopt to manage social and political challenges and achieve competitive advantage? How can nonmarket strategies enable MNEs to better manage complex nonmarket and geopolitical risks? What are innovative business approaches to environmental and social challenges? In some cases, MNEs are engaged in social and political issues such as navigating climate change agreements or addressing global migration. In other cases, businesses can help to find solutions to social tensions.

Keywords: Institutions; Institutional environment; Institutional voids; Government; Political environment; Legal environment; International business policy; Nonmarket strategy; Corporate Social Responsibility; Corporate Political Activity; Political strategies; Corporate diplomacy; Social sustainability; Supranational governance; Regional integration; Trade agreements; Trade disputes; Uncertainty; Volatility; Social license; Country risk; Political risk; Disaster risk; Societal impact; Social movements; Rule of law; Law; Regulation; Government intervention; Protectionism; Trade barriers; Foreign trade zone; Subsidies and incentives; Public policy; Global governance; Instability; Migration; Poverty; Protectionism; Stakeholders; US-China rivalry; Geopolitics

11. Sustainability in international business

Track Co-Chairs:
Sandra Alday, University of Sydney, sandra.seno-alday@sydney.edu.au
Maria Beamond, RMIT University, maria.beamond@rmit.edu.au

Sustainability is integral to global economic development and to firms’ international business engagement (i.e., operations, behavior and interaction with stakeholders). International firms are key societal actors and called on to consider and contribute to the sustainable development challenge in their decisions and actions. Multinational enterprises in particular have taken up the challenge, though progress has been slow. This may be partly due to the managerial difficulties of balancing shareholder needs and stakeholder interests, and limited resources to address the promise-performance gap. The track welcomes papers that explore firms’ engagement in sustainability through: reducing carbon footprints; better use of resources throughout the value chains; managing and engaging employees to create a sustainable business; climate change: performance monitoring; creation of a holistic thinking and action; adopting circular economy techniques; implementing latest digital technologies; achieving United Nations’ Sustainable Development goals; or working with national and international policies. This track invites empirical, conceptual, and theoretical research that addresses these issues and increases understanding on how international business shapes and is shaped by sustainability. Contributions that guide scholars to navigate sustainability research to gain actionable knowledge for managers are also welcome.

Keywords: Environmental sustainability; Sustainability development goals (SDGs); Sustainable global value chains (GVCs); Green development; Natural environment; Pollution; Environmental harm; Energy; Economic inequality; Social welfare; Business ethics; Circular economy; Digital sustainability; Corporate social responsibility (CSR) sustainable human resources; holistic mindset; and climate change.

12. Knowledge, innovation, and technology 

Track Co-Chairs:
Cyndi Zhang, Singapore Management University, cyndizhang@smu.edu.sg
Cuili Qian, University of Texas at Dallas, cuili.qian@utdallas.edu

This track deals with the creation, transfer and exploitation of knowledge, issues central both to the theory of the MNE and to MNE management, organization, and strategy. It examines the structure, location and governance of both internal R&D and R&D undertaken in cooperation with external parties. The theme comprises how MNEs through imitation, licensing, joint ventures, acquisitions and collaborations with other firms can access and absorb novel technical and scientific advances, and the challenges associated with the protection of proprietary technology, especially in weak appropriability regimes. Relevant is the study of all these aspects of MNE behavior both in their own right, and in terms of their relationships to the changing geography of innovation, and the evolution of national and regional innovation systems.

Keywords: Knowledge governance; Knowledge sharing; International R&D; R&D strategy and management; Management of innovation; Reverse innovation; Open innovation; Innovation networks; National innovation systems; Innovation clusters; Information technology; Digital technology; Digital platform; International technology strategy; Reverse technology transfer; Technology transfer; Replication and imitation; Appropriability regimes; Inventor mobility; Patenting strategy; Local embeddedness; Cross-border connectivity; Internet; Big data; Analytics

13. Local track: Top management teams and corporate governance, and their formal and informal institutional contexts  

Track Co-Chairs:
Aya Chacar, Florida International University, chacara@fiu.edu
Danielle Combs, Florida International University, dajones@fiu.edu

Top management teams (TMTs) and corporate governance studies are central to the management field. International business scholars can help advance our growing knowledge in this field. This track invites papers that bring corporate governance and TMTs to the forefront of international business research by exploring their intersection with formal and/or informal institutions. IB researchers can help expand our knowledge through comparative studies or by studying TMTs and corporate governance in the MNE context. As firms operate in a global business environment or internationalize, they may be faced with a diversity of governance and monitoring needs throughout the MNE. Different governance structures and institutional environments may also impact the makeup, roles, and decision-making responsibilities of TMT members. Papers in this track can (but are not limited to) answer such questions as: How do institutional environments shape and determine the effectiveness of various governance and monitoring mechanisms? To what extent do institutions determine the development, selection, retention, and turnover of TMT members. How do the roles of different TMT members or their composition differ in different institutional environments? How do governance needs and the roles of TMT members co-evolve with institutions in emerging and transition economies? How do governance mechanisms and institutions interact to influence various outcomes such as location choice, performance, and misdeeds? How does the structure and use of executive compensation vary across institutional environments? How have institutions played a role in the presence and responsibilities of more specialized executives such as Chief Sustainability Officers and Chief Diversity Officers on the TMT?

Keywords: Corporate governance; top management teams; c-suite; international corporate governance; institutions; institutional environment; institutional distance; board of directors; corporate governance in emerging markets; emerging market top management teams; state ownership; business groups; board diversity; top management team selection and/or turnover; executive compensation; corporate monitoring

14. Conference track: Beyond diversity and inclusion: Equity and fairness in international business

Co-Chairs:
Marleen Dieleman, National University of Singapore, marleen@nus.edu.sg
Andrew Delios, National University of Singapore, andrew@nus.edu.sg

The 2020s has been marked by many dramatic changes across business environments worldwide. Yet, a consistent theme emerging in almost all markets is a call for greater equity and fairness in business practices, in competition between organizations and in competition and relationships between nationstates. As many have foreseen, but as many more now realize, equity and fairness are much more than rhetorical concepts – they are very real aspects of doing business in the contemporary world; and no more so is the management challenge greater than in International Business, where variance in perceptions and connotations will vary widely across world regions. This track welcomes papers that address the influence of considerations of equity and fairness on the research questions we address as a global academic body, on the way in which we structure our academic investigations including the methods we implement and the people who inform our investigations; on the way in which academic bodies such as the AIB and the institutions in which we work are staffed and organized, on the way in which globalization and its pursuit are emboldened and threatened by variances in competitive practices across nations, and on other such wide-sweeping trends in global markets that connect to equity and fairness. In this track, we are particularly interested in panels that tackle issues of prominence, where debate can emerge, yet where research itself might not yet be well-positioned to address these issues. We envision a program enriched by discussions on issues of concern to us all, but for which we seldom have an open forum that welcomes open and informed debate.

Keywords: Education; equity; fairness; inequality; international competition; globalization and deglobalization; nation-state; state capitalism; public goods; non-market strategy; influence; corporate diplomacy; corporate diplomats; vaccine diplomacy; leadership in universities; leadership in academic organizations; management practice

Submitting Your Work

All submissions must be made through AIB’s online submission system, which will open December 1, 2021. An official Submission Guide will be posted on our website soon with information on how to prepare and submit your work.

1. Internationalization processes and international entrepreneurship

Track Co-Chairs:
Jing Zhang, Old Dominion University, j3zhang@odu.edu
Maria Elo, University of Southern Denmark, melo@sam.sdu.dk

Rapidly internationalizing SMEs compete and cooperate with large MNEs in the global market. This track seeks contributions that examine the internationalization process-and its fairness-for different kinds of firms, whether small and entrepreneurial firms, established multinationals, or latecomer MNEs from emerging markets. It covers contributions that focus on the characteristics of the process, whether gradual, rapid or leapfrogging, increasing or decreasing, as well as the various kinds of human, financial and political resources firms draw on in their internationalization. It can also cover contributions that examine diversity and inclusion in entrepreneurship, including different kind of entrepreneurs based on gender, race, origin, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, location, etc.

Keywords: Internationalization process; Entry modes; Exporting; Gradual internationalization; Rapid internationalization; Early internationalization; Internationalization and performance; De-internationalization; Re-internationalization; International entrepreneurship; Migrant entrepreneurship, Transnational entrepreneurship, Diaspora entrepreneurship, Returnee entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurial networks; SME exporters; International new ventures; Born-global firms

2. International marketing strategy and consumer behavior

Track Co-Chairs:
Nandini Nim, University of Texas at El Paso, nnim@utep.edu
Suparna Chakraborty, University of San Francisco, schakraborty2@usfca.edu

International marketing field is transforming rapidly under the influences of digitalization, technological advances, sustainability pressures, regulatory restrictions, an expanded geographic scope, and global marketing ecosystems. How do international marketing managers cope with, or even thrive under such challenges? How do consumers respond to these challenges and changes? Succeeding in ever more complex, interconnected and at the same time fragmented consumer markets requires an in-depth understanding of cross-national and crosscultural similarities/differences, as well as how these similarities/differences affect firms and their customers. This track seeks contributions from both international marketing strategy and consumer behavior sub-field within international marketing.

Keywords: Cross-cultural marketing; Advertising; Pricing; Marketing channels; Distribution channels; Products/services; Standardization/Adaptation; Brand management; Consumer behavior; Customer relationships; Customer Experience; Cross-cultural consumer behavior; Country-of-origin effects; Consumer animosity; Consumer well-being; Country-of-origin effects; Digital marketing; Social media marketing; Global retailing; Professional services marketing; B2B marketing; Relationship marketing; Technology-driven marketing or Technology marketing; Marketing to governments; Market targeting; Segmentation

3. Finance, accounting, and corporate governance

Track Co-Chairs:
Christina Mühr, WU Vienna Institute for International Business, christina.muehr@wu.ac.at
Anna Grosman, Loughborough University London, A.Grosman@lboro.ac.uk

The track emphasizes investment and financing choices, financial and corporate reporting, and risk management in multinational firms. Firms utilize various governance approaches and allocate decision-making to maximize organizational value while following financial reporting requirements of various nations. Corporate governance encompasses varying levels of internal and external oversight – board structures, compensation practices, ownership patterns, shareholder activism efforts, and disclosure choices across firms and national markets. We invite contributions on international finance and accounting, sustainable finance, MNE management, and corporate governance practices in an international context. We welcome novel research on the determinants of governance practices such as legal, financial, and political institutions, and their influences on performance outcomes, accounting standards, financial reporting quality, tax planning practices, financial risk management practices, CSR practices, bank lending, capital market development, venture capital development, and mergers and acquisitions. We also welcome submissions that address the influences of international investors on firm strategies, such as international private equity, sovereign wealth funds, international venture capital, international hedge funds, and international crowdfunding. In terms of the strategies and practices international investors follow and disseminate, papers could, for instance, address ownership changes or continuity, the limits of ownership and property rights, location-specific financial advantages, and the pursuit of sustainable practices in target firms.

Keywords: International finance and taxation; Transfer pricing; Corporate malfeasance; Accounting standards and conventions; Non-financial accounting standards; Non-financial reporting standards; International financial reporting; Valuation; Capital structure; Financial risk management; Macroeconomic risk management; Global risks; Exchange rate exposure; International financial integration; International cross-listing; Ownership structure; Institutional investors; State ownership; Family ownership; Shareholder activism; Business groups; Board diversity; Board processes, and effectiveness; Directorship interlocks; CEO turnover; CEO-board dynamics; Firm-stakeholder relationships; Stakeholder activism; Shareholder rights protections; Management compensation; Institutional investors; Mutual funds; Pension funds; International private equity; Sovereign wealth funds; International venture capital; International hedge funds; International crowdfunding; Sustainable finance; Fintech

4. Global strategy, organization, and value chains

Track Co-Chairs:
Stephanie Wang, Indiana University, slwang@indiana.edu
Anna Lamin, Northeastern University, a.lamin@northeastern.edu

MNEs are profoundly adjusting their strategies and configurations to leverage the opportunities of globalization, and, meanwhile, address the complexity from skepticism of globalization. As firms internationalize, they encounter new situations that present both opportunities and constraints for learning and value creation. Managing and harnessing the complexity of diverse settings across countries is crucial to the success of the global firm. Relevant topics for the track include, but are not limited to, international expansion, cross-border mergers and acquisitions, location strategy, entry mode decisions, outsourcing and offshoring decisions (and their reversal), the management, coordination, and governance of global value chains, as well as the development of MNEs’ organizational capabilities and performance.

Keywords: Global value chains; Global production networks; Global operations; Global sourcing; Outsourcing; Offshoring; Geography of IB activities; Relocation of production; Reshoring; Backshoring; Globalization of services; Global strategy; Growth strategies; Competitive strategy; Mergers and acquisitions; Joint ventures and alliances; Location strategy; Parent-subsidiary relationships; Foreign subsidiary management; MNE performance; Organizational learning; Organizational culture; Boundary spanning; Organizational change and development; Organizational structure; Organization of international operations; Organizational capabilities

5. International HRM, global leadership and cross-cultural management

Track Co-Chairs:
Cordula Barzantny, Toulouse Business School, c.barzantny@tbs-education.fr
Pingping Fu, The University of Nottingham, Pingping.Fu@nottingham.edu.cn

This track encompasses papers dealing with global leadership, effective multicultural teams, cross-cultural management, global talent management and cultural diversity which are all vital to the management of human resources within the multinational firm. This track also includes papers dealing with a range of HR activities from recruitment and selection to training, performance management, compensation, retention as well as leadership development, and managing multicultural teams. It also covers various international organizational behavior topics and such as the positive and negative effects of diversity for individuals, teams, and organizations, and issues related to cross-cultural management and global mobility. In addition, the track includes papers that address grand societal challenges (e.g., global migration and refugees) and the peoplerelated and cultural implications for the multinational firm with responsible managers and fair organization.

Keywords: Cross-cultural management; International human resource management; Global leadership; Crosscultural leadership; Cosmopolitans; Global mindset; Expatriate management; Talent management; Training and development; Retention; Selection; Performance appraisal; Compensation; Leadership development; Global staffing; International mobility; Education and international careers; Cultural diversity; Cross-cultural communication; Cross-cultural adjustment; Multicultural teams; Virtual teams; Intercultural competence; Cultural intelligence; Bicultural and multicultural identity; International migration; Returnees; Diasporans; Work-family issues; Cross-cultural values and practices; Local compliance; Cultural synergy; Ethics across cultures; Disabilities

6. Gender and diversity 

Track Co-Chairs:
Linn Zhang, Loughborough University London, l.e.zhang@lboro.ac.uk
June Lee, University of San Francisco, june.lee@usfca.edu

Diversity significantly impacts how firms conduct business across borders and manage multinationals and their employees. For example, different societies and organizations vary in terms of expected gender roles, their acceptance of homosexuality and non-traditional gender roles. These issues are often compounded by other aspects of diversity, such as race, ethnicity, physical abilities, language, class, or religion. The track invites papers that advance our understanding of the role of all aspects of diversity across all domains of IB, including leadership, ethics, finance, marketing, risk management, firm performance, corporate governance, firm internationalization, and strategic management.

Keywords: Diversity; Race; Ethnicity; Gender; Gender roles; Gender egalitarianism; Gender-based leadership differences; Gender and internationalization; Women in the multinational organization; Gender and international trade; Sex trafficking; LGBTQ and transgender issues; Gender entrepreneurship; Gender in the global south; race and gender in contexts of crises; Intersectionality of gender, race and class (and other forms of difference); Inequalities; Gender equality policies and practices; Gender relations at workplaces; New forms of masculinities; Gendered identities; Gendered networks; Gendered participation; Gendered ageism; Gendered mobilities; Workplace discrimination; Workplace inclusiveness; Gender fatigue, backlash and resistance to gender equality; Men and masculinities in innovation;

7. Teaching and education

Track Co-Chairs:
Ausrine Silenskyte, University of Vaasa, ausrine.silenskyte@uwasa.fi
Iris Berdrow, Bentley University, IBERDROW@bentley.edu

The main objectives of this track are facilitating development and sharing of best teaching practices, providing a forum for teaching-related knowledge sharing, and promoting research on teaching and education that showcases the importance of IB courses in business school curricula. This track addresses IB teaching at every level: undergraduate, graduate, MBA, and executive and covers all aspects of teaching IB, including student engagement, motivation, learning outcomes, and classroom diversity. Specifically, it focuses on the use of different tools and pedagogies such as experiential learning, cases, simulations, role-play, and various forms of multimedia to enhance IB teaching. To this end, this track invites submissions of scholarly papers, interactive session proposals and panels that stimulate teaching innovation and promote best practices in IB teaching.

In relation to the general theme of the AIB 2022, we are especially welcoming contributions discussing issues of fairness, equity and equality, as well as diversity and inclusion in IB education. More specifically, there are four research areas that the track would like to uplift. First, teaching practices needed to ensure: fairness in the classroom; development of inclusive mind-sets; and incorporation of equity and fairness perspectives in teaching IB theories and frameworks. Second, pedagogical tools that support: utilization of student diversity; handling diversity of perspectives and views in the classroom; and ensuring diversity of materials and examples. Third, development of faculty skills that support: teacher interactions with diverse students ensuring inclusion and elimination of biases in the class; enhancing interactions and learnings among diverse students; appropriate communication (e.g., using inclusive gender pronouns, using expressions that are acceptable within different contexts, cultures, and universally); and handling students and colleagues with different physical and mental abilities. Fourth, fair and equitable assessment of students, faculty, and institutions. For instance, best practices for equity and fairness in formative and normative assessment of students; the ways in which assessment of learning outcomes incorporates diverse perspectives; challenges in promoting equity and fairness in IB educational institutions, and alike.

Keywords: Experiential learning; Developing an IB curriculum; Internationalizing the business school; Internationalizing the curriculum; Cross-cultural classrooms; Case teaching; Executive education; Role of international experience; Simulations and role-playing; Blended learning; Hybrid teaching; Multimedia in IB teaching; IB teaching tools; Management of IB education; Management of educational markets; Competences for teaching IB; Future of IB education, diversity, equity and inclusion in IB teaching IB and education.

8. Research methods

Track Co-Chairs:
Ursula F. Ott, Nottingham Trent University, ursula.ott@ntu.ac.uk
Emmanuella Plakoyiannaki, University of Vienna, emmanuella.plakoyiannaki@univie.ac.at

High-quality and innovative research methods are at the heart of academic scholarship. Thus, developing, challenging, and improving methodological best practice is crucial to our relevance, credibility and growth as a discipline. This track aims not only to recognize and highlight outstanding use of innovative and nontraditional methodological approaches to investigate pertinent International Business (IB) phenomena but also seeks to showcase rigorous, trustworthy and transparent use of methods. It seeks to question methodological conventions in IB and promote cutting-edge developments in mixed-methods, qualitative and quantitative methodological approaches. Areas that papers might cover include: What methods can we develop to address new challenges in IB? How can we adapt more traditional methods for today’s research challenges? How can we account for the dynamism and temporality of IB phenomena? How can we contextualize IB theory and explanation? How can we rethink the balance between “thick” description and generalizability? How does earlier research stand up to analysis with more recent methods? How can we ensure transparency and trustworthiness of our data, research process and theorizing?

Keywords: Research methodology; Mixed methods; Qualitative research; Quantitative research; Ethnography; Interviews; Surveys; Experiments, Triangulation, Analytical rigor, Methodological rigor; Meta-analysis; Interdisciplinary research; Methodological innovation; Equivalence; Reliability; Transparency; Replicability

9. Emerging markets and emerging market MNEs

Track Co-Chairs:
Tanvi Kothari, San Jose State University, tanvi.kothari@sjsu.edu
Nila Wiese, University of Puget Sound, nwiese@pugetsound.edu

This track welcomes papers that explore novel issues of doing business in emerging markets (EMs), such as research on non-market strategies, new business models, government-private sector cooperation, and various forms of partnerships between MNCs and emerging market firms. We encourage papers that clarify the uniqueness and evolution of EM firms (e.g., are they still emerging); and that explore foreign direct investment trends, internationalization and other strategies, and competitive dynamics of EM firms. Papers that address contemporary questions such as the effects of a post-pandemic world on the role and competitiveness of EM firms, and strategies and approaches pursued by EM firms to address issues of diversity, inclusion, and sustainability. Given the evolving role of EMNEs and the born global firms in the growth of emerging markets, we encourage submissions focusing on these firms’ transitions from a culture of incremental innovation to a culture of breakthrough innovation. We strongly welcome papers that explore under-researched emerging markets – e.g., in MENA, Asia, or Latin America. We also invite well-articulated theoretical papers that can advance thinking in these areas, or that enhance understanding of the impact of, and EM firms’ responses to, important global trends.

Keywords: Emerging markets; Emerging market opportunities; Transition economies; Socialism; Capitalism; Colonialism; Economic development; Comparative and competitive advantages; Emerging market institutional environment; Foreign versus indigenous MNEs; State-owned enterprises in emerging markets; Family conglomerates; Privatization; Emerging market firm; Theory of EMNE, Internationalization of EMNEs, EMNEs’ diversity and inclusion strategies, EMNEs and SDGs

10. MNE state relations and international business policy

Track Co-Chairs:
Jing Li, Simon Fraser University, jingli@sfu.ca
Larissa Marchiori Pacheco, Northeastern University, l.marchioripacheco@northeastern.edu

What is the role of business in politics, government, and society? How does global and domestic political uncertainty affect MNEs? With political systems and ideologies in flux, populism on the rise, trade deals being altered or discarded, and the US-China rivalry more intensified, the current situation has given rise to complex political, social, and business challenges, making these questions ever more salient. What strategies and tactics can MNEs adopt to manage social and political challenges and achieve competitive advantage? How can nonmarket strategies enable MNEs to better manage complex nonmarket and geopolitical risks? What are innovative business approaches to environmental and social challenges? In some cases, MNEs are engaged in social and political issues such as navigating climate change agreements or addressing global migration. In other cases, businesses can help to find solutions to social tensions.

Keywords: Institutions; Institutional environment; Institutional voids; Government; Political environment; Legal environment; International business policy; Nonmarket strategy; Corporate Social Responsibility; Corporate Political Activity; Political strategies; Corporate diplomacy; Social sustainability; Supranational governance; Regional integration; Trade agreements; Trade disputes; Uncertainty; Volatility; Social license; Country risk; Political risk; Disaster risk; Societal impact; Social movements; Rule of law; Law; Regulation; Government intervention; Protectionism; Trade barriers; Foreign trade zone; Subsidies and incentives; Public policy; Global governance; Instability; Migration; Poverty; Protectionism; Stakeholders; US-China rivalry; Geopolitics

11. Sustainability in international business

Track Co-Chairs:
Sandra Alday, University of Sydney, sandra.seno-alday@sydney.edu.au
Maria Beamond, RMIT University, maria.beamond@rmit.edu.au

Sustainability is integral to global economic development and to firms’ international business engagement (i.e., operations, behavior and interaction with stakeholders). International firms are key societal actors and called on to consider and contribute to the sustainable development challenge in their decisions and actions. Multinational enterprises in particular have taken up the challenge, though progress has been slow. This may be partly due to the managerial difficulties of balancing shareholder needs and stakeholder interests, and limited resources to address the promise-performance gap. The track welcomes papers that explore firms’ engagement in sustainability through: reducing carbon footprints; better use of resources throughout the value chains; managing and engaging employees to create a sustainable business; climate change: performance monitoring; creation of a holistic thinking and action; adopting circular economy techniques; implementing latest digital technologies; achieving United Nations’ Sustainable Development goals; or working with national and international policies. This track invites empirical, conceptual, and theoretical research that addresses these issues and increases understanding on how international business shapes and is shaped by sustainability. Contributions that guide scholars to navigate sustainability research to gain actionable knowledge for managers are also welcome.

Keywords: Environmental sustainability; Sustainability development goals (SDGs); Sustainable global value chains (GVCs); Green development; Natural environment; Pollution; Environmental harm; Energy; Economic inequality; Social welfare; Business ethics; Circular economy; Digital sustainability; Corporate social responsibility (CSR) sustainable human resources; holistic mindset; and climate change.

12. Knowledge, innovation, and technology 

Track Co-Chairs:
Cyndi Zhang, Singapore Management University, cyndizhang@smu.edu.sg
Cuili Qian, University of Texas at Dallas, cuili.qian@utdallas.edu

This track deals with the creation, transfer and exploitation of knowledge, issues central both to the theory of the MNE and to MNE management, organization, and strategy. It examines the structure, location and governance of both internal R&D and R&D undertaken in cooperation with external parties. The theme comprises how MNEs through imitation, licensing, joint ventures, acquisitions and collaborations with other firms can access and absorb novel technical and scientific advances, and the challenges associated with the protection of proprietary technology, especially in weak appropriability regimes. Relevant is the study of all these aspects of MNE behavior both in their own right, and in terms of their relationships to the changing geography of innovation, and the evolution of national and regional innovation systems.

Keywords: Knowledge governance; Knowledge sharing; International R&D; R&D strategy and management; Management of innovation; Reverse innovation; Open innovation; Innovation networks; National innovation systems; Innovation clusters; Information technology; Digital technology; Digital platform; International technology strategy; Reverse technology transfer; Technology transfer; Replication and imitation; Appropriability regimes; Inventor mobility; Patenting strategy; Local embeddedness; Cross-border connectivity; Internet; Big data; Analytics

13. Local track: Top management teams and corporate governance, and their formal and informal institutional contexts  

Track Co-Chairs:
Aya Chacar, Florida International University, chacara@fiu.edu
Danielle Combs, Florida International University, dajones@fiu.edu

Top management teams (TMTs) and corporate governance studies are central to the management field. International business scholars can help advance our growing knowledge in this field. This track invites papers that bring corporate governance and TMTs to the forefront of international business research by exploring their intersection with formal and/or informal institutions. IB researchers can help expand our knowledge through comparative studies or by studying TMTs and corporate governance in the MNE context. As firms operate in a global business environment or internationalize, they may be faced with a diversity of governance and monitoring needs throughout the MNE. Different governance structures and institutional environments may also impact the makeup, roles, and decision-making responsibilities of TMT members. Papers in this track can (but are not limited to) answer such questions as: How do institutional environments shape and determine the effectiveness of various governance and monitoring mechanisms? To what extent do institutions determine the development, selection, retention, and turnover of TMT members. How do the roles of different TMT members or their composition differ in different institutional environments? How do governance needs and the roles of TMT members co-evolve with institutions in emerging and transition economies? How do governance mechanisms and institutions interact to influence various outcomes such as location choice, performance, and misdeeds? How does the structure and use of executive compensation vary across institutional environments? How have institutions played a role in the presence and responsibilities of more specialized executives such as Chief Sustainability Officers and Chief Diversity Officers on the TMT?

Keywords: Corporate governance; top management teams; c-suite; international corporate governance; institutions; institutional environment; institutional distance; board of directors; corporate governance in emerging markets; emerging market top management teams; state ownership; business groups; board diversity; top management team selection and/or turnover; executive compensation; corporate monitoring

14. Conference track: Beyond diversity and inclusion: Equity and fairness in international business

Co-Chairs:
Marleen Dieleman, National University of Singapore, marleen@nus.edu.sg
Andrew Delios, National University of Singapore, andrew@nus.edu.sg

The 2020s has been marked by many dramatic changes across business environments worldwide. Yet, a consistent theme emerging in almost all markets is a call for greater equity and fairness in business practices, in competition between organizations and in competition and relationships between nationstates. As many have foreseen, but as many more now realize, equity and fairness are much more than rhetorical concepts – they are very real aspects of doing business in the contemporary world; and no more so is the management challenge greater than in International Business, where variance in perceptions and connotations will vary widely across world regions. This track welcomes papers that address the influence of considerations of equity and fairness on the research questions we address as a global academic body, on the way in which we structure our academic investigations including the methods we implement and the people who inform our investigations; on the way in which academic bodies such as the AIB and the institutions in which we work are staffed and organized, on the way in which globalization and its pursuit are emboldened and threatened by variances in competitive practices across nations, and on other such wide-sweeping trends in global markets that connect to equity and fairness. In this track, we are particularly interested in panels that tackle issues of prominence, where debate can emerge, yet where research itself might not yet be well-positioned to address these issues. We envision a program enriched by discussions on issues of concern to us all, but for which we seldom have an open forum that welcomes open and informed debate.

Keywords: Education; equity; fairness; inequality; international competition; globalization and deglobalization; nation-state; state capitalism; public goods; non-market strategy; influence; corporate diplomacy; corporate diplomats; vaccine diplomacy; leadership in universities; leadership in academic organizations; management practice

Submitting Your Work

All submissions must be made through AIB’s online submission system, which will open December 1, 2021. An official Submission Guide will be posted on our website soon with information on how to prepare and submit your work.