Fast Facts

  • Conference Dates: July 5 – 9
  • Location: SGH Warsaw School of Economics; Warsaw, Poland
  • Theme: International Business Resilience under Global Disruptions
  • Program Chair: Kazuhiro Asakawa, Keio University (2023chair@aib.msu.edu)
  • Submission Deadline: January 10, 2023

International Business Resilience under
Global Disruptions

Today’s international business is challenged by unprecedented global disruptions. The COVID-19 pandemic, war and geopolitical tensions, Brexit, economic nationalism, surge of populist governments, the US-China tech rivalry, fragile cyber security, terrorism, climate change, and financial crisis are among the most notable examples.

Such global disruptions undoubtedly influence the nature of international business (IB). Global mobility of workforce, knowledge, technology, and financial capitals is constrained. International trade, investment and sales are restricted. Global value chain networks are disrupted. Risk-averse foreign investment and divestment decisions are made by multinational corporations (MNCs) to mitigate such risks and uncertainty.

Resilience, a capability to anticipate and cope with various kinds of disruptions in agile manners, is called for at various levels – government, MNC, and individual – to deal with global crisis. Dimensions and typical agenda of IB resilience include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Resilience to develop or maintain new world order: What are the roles of national governments to build resilience to global disruptions? What are the roles of government, international and regional organizations, and MNC to develop world order?
  • Resilience to shrinking international trade, declining sales, and soaring costs: How can MNCs cope with disruption in international trade and sales? How can they manage rising cost in energy and raw materials?
  • Resilience to changes in consumer behavior: How do MNCs cope with increased tension and changed consumption patterns due to global disruption? How do they cope with sudden changes in consumer behavior?
  • Resilience to divestment and termination of foreign operations: How can MNCs cope with divestment and closure of foreign operations due to disruption? What are new criteria for FDI, location decision, mode of entry, governance, and M&As under global disruption?
  • Resilience to regain competitive advantage under disruption: How do MNCs redefine strategic positioning and rebuild capabilities to attain strategic renewal in the wake of global disruption?
  • Resilience to global value chain disruption: How can MNCs maintain value chain operations without interruptions by substituting suppliers’ networks? How can they be agile in alternating the sources, without hastily retreating to a reshoring option? What are organizational capabilities of MNCs to mitigate risks of supply chain disruption?
  • Resilience to disruption in global innovation and knowledge sourcing: How can MNCs access, mobilize and leverage cross-border tacit knowledge when national borders are restricted? How can MNCs maintain global open innovations in the age of tightened national borders?
  • Resilience to disruption in human resource mobility and employment: How do MNCs cope with shortage of commuter employees and immigrant workers? How do MNCs provide support to individual employees under mental stress due to abrupt shock of global disruption? How can individual managers build resilience capability to anticipate and manage turbulence?
  • Resilience to financial disruption: How do MNCs cope with financial crisis and liquidity risk under global disruption? How can MNCs secure international capital flows without interruptions?
  • Resilience to disruption in cyber security: How do MNCs ensure their data security from cyber-attack and virus under global disruption?

These and other dimensions of international business resilience hold important implications for research and practice on IB. They suggest what new capabilities are necessary for government, MNCs, and individual managers to cope with disruptions; what new roles policy makers, business managers, and employees play in building more resilient global communities; and what new sources of competitive advantage of nations and firms are in the age of global disruption. This conference theme further explores new paradigm of IB, change and continuity in IB, and myths and reality in IB, in the age of global disruption. Warsaw, our host location being exposed to geopolitical, socioeconomic changes, provides an important setting to discuss resilience to global disruption. The AIB 2023 conference theme highlights important contemporary agenda in IB.

To learn more, we invite you to view the following video introduction, presented by our host institution SGH Warsaw School of Economics.

International Business Resilience under
Global Disruptions

Today’s international business is challenged by unprecedented global disruptions. The COVID-19 pandemic, war and geopolitical tensions, Brexit, economic nationalism, surge of populist governments, the US-China tech rivalry, fragile cyber security, terrorism, climate change, and financial crisis are among the most notable examples.

Such global disruptions undoubtedly influence the nature of international business (IB). Global mobility of workforce, knowledge, technology, and financial capitals is constrained. International trade, investment and sales are restricted. Global value chain networks are disrupted. Risk-averse foreign investment and divestment decisions are made by multinational corporations (MNCs) to mitigate such risks and uncertainty.

Resilience, a capability to anticipate and cope with various kinds of disruptions in agile manners, is called for at various levels – government, MNC, and individual – to deal with global crisis. Dimensions and typical agenda of IB resilience include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Resilience to develop or maintain new world order: What are the roles of national governments to build resilience to global disruptions? What are the roles of government, international and regional organizations, and MNC to develop world order?
  • Resilience to shrinking international trade, declining sales, and soaring costs: How can MNCs cope with disruption in international trade and sales? How can they manage rising cost in energy and raw materials?
  • Resilience to changes in consumer behavior: How do MNCs cope with increased tension and changed consumption patterns due to global disruption? How do they cope with sudden changes in consumer behavior?
  • Resilience to divestment and termination of foreign operations: How can MNCs cope with divestment and closure of foreign operations due to disruption? What are new criteria for FDI, location decision, mode of entry, governance, and M&As under global disruption?
  • Resilience to regain competitive advantage under disruption: How do MNCs redefine strategic positioning and rebuild capabilities to attain strategic renewal in the wake of global disruption?
  • Resilience to global value chain disruption: How can MNCs maintain value chain operations without interruptions by substituting suppliers’ networks? How can they be agile in alternating the sources, without hastily retreating to a reshoring option? What are organizational capabilities of MNCs to mitigate risks of supply chain disruption?
  • Resilience to disruption in global innovation and knowledge sourcing: How can MNCs access, mobilize and leverage cross-border tacit knowledge when national borders are restricted? How can MNCs maintain global open innovations in the age of tightened national borders?
  • Resilience to disruption in human resource mobility and employment: How do MNCs cope with shortage of commuter employees and immigrant workers? How do MNCs provide support to individual employees under mental stress due to abrupt shock of global disruption? How can individual managers build resilience capability to anticipate and manage turbulence?
  • Resilience to financial disruption: How do MNCs cope with financial crisis and liquidity risk under global disruption? How can MNCs secure international capital flows without interruptions?
  • Resilience to disruption in cyber security: How do MNCs ensure their data security from cyber-attack and virus under global disruption?

These and other dimensions of international business resilience hold important implications for research and practice on IB. They suggest what new capabilities are necessary for government, MNCs, and individual managers to cope with disruptions; what new roles policy makers, business managers, and employees play in building more resilient global communities; and what new sources of competitive advantage of nations and firms are in the age of global disruption. This conference theme further explores new paradigm of IB, change and continuity in IB, and myths and reality in IB, in the age of global disruption. Warsaw, our host location being exposed to geopolitical, socioeconomic changes, provides an important setting to discuss resilience to global disruption. The AIB 2023 conference theme highlights important contemporary agenda in IB.

To learn more, we invite you to view the following video introduction, presented by our host institution SGH Warsaw School of Economics.

Conference Tracks

1. Internationalization processes and international entrepreneurship

Track Co-Chairs:
Martina Musteen, San Diego State University, mmusteen@sdsu.edu
Krzysztof Wach, Krakow University of Economics, wachk@uek.krakow.pl

The post-pandemic world continues to be characterized by heightened geo-political tensions and dire economic, social and environmental challenges. It is the role of international entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial firms to be alert to, discover, and pursue opportunities in this context, opportunities that arise as a result of cross-border differences in resource and institutional endowments, capabilities, and technologies. This track seeks contributions that examine internationalization processes primarily as an entrepreneurial process of discovering, assessing and exploiting international business opportunities from various theoretical lenses, using a variety of methodological approaches and datasets.

Keywords: Internationalization process; International entrepreneurship; SMEs; Entrepreneurial networks; SME exporters/importers; International new ventures; Born-global firms; Born-digital firms; Business development; Opportunity discovery; Opportunity exploitation; Entrepreneurial internationalization; International venturing; Entrepreneurial alertness; International innovation; Entry modes; Exporting/Importing.

2. International marketing strategy and consumer behavior

Track Co-Chairs:
Peter Gabrielsson, University of Vaasa, peter.gabrielsson@uwasa.fi
Peter Magnusson, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, peter.magnusson@utrgv.edu

The international marketing field is transforming rapidly under the influences of digitalization, technological advances, sustainability pressures, geopolitical conflicts and tension, and regulatory restrictions. How do international marketing managers cope with, or even thrive under such challenges? How do consumers respond to these challenges and changes? Succeeding in ever more complex, interconnected and at the same time fragmented consumer markets requires an in-depth understanding of cross-national and cross-cultural similarities/differences, as well as how these similarities/differences affect firms and their customers. This track seeks contributions from both international marketing strategy and consumer behavior sub-fields within international marketing.

Keywords: Cross-cultural marketing; International marketing; Global marketing; Advertising; Pricing; Marketing channels; Distribution channels; Products/services; Standardization/Adaptation; Brand management; Consumer behavior; Customer relationships; Customer Experience; Cross-cultural consumer behavior; Country-of-origin effects; Consumer animosity; Consumer well-being; Digital marketing; Social media marketing; Global retailing; Professional services marketing; B2B marketing; Relationship marketing; Technology-driven marketing / Technology marketing; Entrepreneurial marketing; Sustainable marketing; Green marketing; Marketing to governments; Market targeting; Segmentation.

3. International finance, accounting, and corporate governance

Track Co-Chairs:
Omrane Guedhami, University of South Carolina, omrane.guedhami@usc.edu
April Knill, Florida State University, aknill@fsu.edu

The track emphasizes investment and financing choices, financial and corporate reporting, and risk management in multinational firms. Firms utilize various governance approaches and allocate decision-making to maximize organizational value while following financial reporting requirements of various nations. Corporate governance encompasses varying levels of internal and external oversight – board structures, compensation practices, ownership patterns, shareholder activism efforts, and disclosure choices across firms and national markets. We invite contributions on international finance and accounting, sustainable finance, MNE management, and corporate governance practices in an international context. We welcome novel research on the determinants of governance practices such as legal, financial, and political institutions, and their influences on performance outcomes, accounting standards, financial reporting quality, tax planning practices, financial risk management practices, ESG practices, climate risk management, bank lending, capital market development, venture capital development, and mergers and acquisitions. We also welcome submissions that address the influences of international investors on firm strategies, such as international private equity, sovereign wealth funds, international venture capital, international hedge funds, and international crowdfunding. In terms of the strategies and practices international investors follow and disseminate, papers could, for instance, address ownership changes or continuity, the limits of ownership and property rights, location-specific financial advantages, and the pursuit of sustainable practices in target firms.

Keywords: International finance and taxation; Transfer pricing; Corporate malfeasance; Accounting standards and conventions; Non-financial accounting standards; Non-financial reporting standards; International financial reporting; Valuation; Capital structure; Financial risk management; Macroeconomic risk management; Global risks; Exchange rate exposure; International financial integration; International cross-listing; Ownership structure; Institutional investors; State ownership; Family ownership; Shareholder activism; Business groups; Board diversity; Board processes, and effectiveness; Directorship interlocks; CEO turnover; CEO-board dynamics; Firm-stakeholder relationships; Stakeholder activism; Shareholder rights protections; Management compensation; Institutional investors; Mutual funds; Pension funds; International private equity; Sovereign wealth funds; International venture capital; International hedge funds; International crowdfunding; Sustainable finance; Climate risk; Fintech.

4. Global strategy, organization, and value chains

Track Co-Chairs:
Sinéad Monaghan, Trinity College Dublin, sinead.monaghan@tcd.ie
Hussain Rammal, The University of Adelaide, hussain.rammal@adelaide.edu.au

Strategic decisions and global value chains are exposed to significant macro-economic changes. MNEs face the challenge of adjusting their strategies in the post-pandemic recovery period, where the uncertainty in the global business landscape is further agitated by geopolitical tensions. Global value chain disruptions and rising economic nationalism present opportunities and challenges. The ability to manage and harness the complexity of diverse settings across countries is crucial to the success of the global firm. Relevant topics for the track include, but are not limited to, international expansion, cross-border mergers and acquisitions, location strategy, entry mode decisions, outsourcing and offshoring decisions (and their reversal), the management, coordination, and governance of global value chains, as well as the development of MNEs’ organizational capabilities and performance.

Keywords: Global strategy; Globalization of services; Growth strategies; Competitive strategy; Global value chains; Global production networks; Global operations; Global sourcing; Outsourcing; Offshoring; Geography of IB activities; Relocation of production; Reshoring; Backshoring; Mergers and acquisitions; Joint ventures and alliances; Location strategy; Parent-subsidiary relationships; Foreign subsidiary management; MNE performance; Organizational learning; Organizational culture; Boundary spanning; Organizational change and development; Organizational structure; Organization of international operations; Organizational capabilities.

5. International HRM, global leadership and cross-cultural management

Track Co-Chairs:
Abby Jingzi Zhou, University of Nottingham Ningbo China, Abby.Zhou@nottingham.edu.cn
Marie-Thérèse Claes, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business, marie.claes@wu.ac.at

This track encompasses papers dealing with global talent management, global leadership, cross-cultural management, effective multicultural teams, and cultural diversity which are all vital to the management of human resources within the multinational firm. This track also includes papers dealing with a range of international HR activities from recruitment and selection to training, performance management, compensation, retention as well as leadership development, and managing multicultural teams. It also covers various international organizational behavior topics and such as the positive and negative effects of diversity for individuals, teams, and organizations, and issues related to cross-cultural management and global mobility. In addition, the track includes papers that address grand societal challenges (e.g., global migration and refugees) and the people related and cultural implications for the multinational firm.

Keywords: Cross-cultural management; International human resource management; Global leadership; Cross-cultural leadership; Cosmopolitans; Global mindset; Expatriate management; Talent management; Training and development; Retention; Selection; Performance appraisal; Compensation; Leadership development; Global staffing; International mobility; Education and international careers; Cultural diversity; Cross-cultural communication; Cross-cultural adjustment; Multicultural teams; Virtual teams; Intercultural competence; Cultural intelligence; Bicultural and multicultural identity; International migration; Returnees; Diasporans; Work-family issues; Cross-cultural values and practices; Local compliance; Cultural synergy; Ethics across cultures; Disabilities; Hybrid working; Leadership revisited; Green HRM; HRM in different cultural settings; The future of expatriation after COVID-19; Trust and control in hybrid/ international teams; Aging workforce; Remote work; Digital HRM.

6. Gender and diversity

Track Co-Chairs:
Saba S. Colakoglu, Georgia Institute of Technology, saba.colakoglu@scheller.gatech.edu
Matevz (Matt) Raskovic, Auckland University of Technology, matt.raskovic@aut.ac.nz

The track invites empirical, conceptual, methodological and review papers that advance our understanding of any aspect of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) across all domains (i.e., strategy, leadership, HRM, marketing, entrepreneurship, innovation, policy) and all levels of IB (i.e., supranational level, national level, industry level, organizational level, team level, community level and/or individual level). We welcome papers that reflect and capture the colorful reality of today’s diverse world and advance our understanding of the intersectionality of various aspects of diversity and belonging within multinational organizations, multinational teams and/or across societies. So far, we have mostly looked at isolated aspects of diversity connected to gender, race and ethnicity. On the other hand, our examination of the additive and compounding effects of various types of diversity on firm performance, effectiveness of teams and/or competitiveness of nations remains limited. Understanding the specific mechanisms through which intersectional social identities connected to gender identity, sexual orientation, immigration status, indigenous identity, different ableness and/or neurodiverse status shape IB outcomes and processes at various levels can further constitute a fruitful avenue for IB research and policy. We also encourage methodological papers advancing our understanding of how to operationalize intersectionality in DEI terms and measure its effects on performance within IB contexts. Papers addressing LGBTQIA+ communities, neurodiverse individuals, those differently abled and/or indigenous voices are especially welcome, as is cutting edge IB research on gender, race and ethnicity.

Keywords: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI); Belonging; DEI business cases; the link between DEI and corporate strategy; Microfoundations of DEI; DEI and social entrepreneurship; DEI and non-government organizations (NGOs); Diffusion of DEI practices; Standardization-localization of DEI practices; Regional, national and sub-national differences in DEI practices; DEI practices and policies in emerging markets; DEI and institutional (de)evolution; Social identity; Identity intersectionality; Social construction of differences and inequalities; Discrimination; Performativity; Inclusiveness; Representation; Advocacy; Social justice; Allyship; Minorities; Economics of belonging; Diversity and creativity; Double-edged sword of diversity; Race; Ethnicity; Social class; Religion; Gender and gender identity; Gender roles; Gender and language; Gender equality and equity; Gender-based leadership differences; Gender and internationalization; Women in the multinational organization; Gender relations at work; Gender and entrepreneurship; Gender and innovation; Gender and the SDGs; Intersectionality of gender, race and other social identities; Gendered networks; Gender fatigue; Gender and social movements; Gender-related international business policy; Gender backlash; Masculinity and fragile masculinity; Gender and sexual orientation; the LGBTQIA+ community; Sexuality at the workplace; Sex trafficking; Immigration status and discrimination; Indigenous voices and representation; Ancestry; Neurodiversity; Different ableness; Ageism; Decolonization; DEI and education and learning.

7. Teaching and education

Track Co-Chairs:
Miguel Cordova, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (PUCP), cordova.miguel@pucp.edu.pe
Karen Lynden, University of North Carolina Wilmington, k_lynden@uncg.edu

The main objectives of this track are facilitating development and sharing of best teaching practices, providing a forum for teaching-related knowledge sharing, and promoting research on teaching and education that showcases the importance of IB courses in business school curricula. This track addresses IB teaching at every level: undergraduate, graduate, MBA, and executive and covers all aspects of teaching IB, including student engagement, motivation, learning outcomes, and classroom diversity. Specifically, it focuses on the use of different tools and pedagogies such as experiential learning, cases, simulations, role-play, and various forms of multimedia to enhance IB teaching. To this end, this track invites submissions of scholarly papers, interactive session proposals, and panels that stimulate teaching innovation and promote best practices in IB teaching.

Following the general theme of the AIB 2023 Annual Meeting, International Business Resilience under Global Disruptions, we are especially welcoming teaching and learning centered contributions related to how international businesses can navigate and thrive within turbulent contexts. Overall, there are three areas that the track would like to encourage. First, teaching practices, curriculum, programming, and pedagogical tools that support students’ learning process, emphasizing the development of materials, methodologies, and examples. Second, development of faculty skills that support digital education, internationalization of the curriculum, cross-cultural learning environments, and multidisciplinary approaches. Third, presentations centered on sharing experiences with the development of resilient higher education programming in response to global disruptions.

Keywords: Experiential learning; Developing an IB curriculum; Internationalizing the business school; Internationalizing the curriculum; Multidisciplinary teaching; Cross-cultural classrooms; Critical perspectives; Case teaching; Executive education; Role of international experience; Simulations and role-playing; Blended learning; Hybrid teaching; Multimedia in IB teaching; IB teaching tools; Travel Abroad; Global Virtual Exchange; Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL); Management of IB education; Management of educational markets; Competences for teaching IB; Future of IB education; Teaching Sustainability; Education for Sustainability; DEIB and Teaching; IB and education.

8. Research methods

Track Co-Chairs:
Eriikka Paavilainen-Mäntymäki, University of Turku, ejpama@utu.fi
Niina Nummela, University of Turku, niina.nummela@utu.fi

High-quality and innovative research methods are at the heart of progressive and vibrant academic scholarship. Thus, developing, challenging, and improving methodological best practice is crucial to the relevance, credibility and growth of our discipline. This Research Methods track aims not only to recognize and highlight the outstanding use of innovative and non-traditional methodological approaches to investigate pertinent International Business (IB) phenomena, but also seeks to showcase rigorous, trustworthy and transparent use of methods. Additionally, we want to direct the attention of IB scholars to questions that continue to deserve our attention, including, for example, the following:

  • How could we extend the dialogue between methods and disciplines? How could interdisciplinary research or triangulation be a source of methodological contribution?
  • How should we study changes and dynamics against a long-term context, what does it require from the method and the scholar?
  • How should we promote the assessment of trustworthiness in IB research, indifferent of the research method chosen?
  • What is the role of ontological and epistemological underpinnings in IB research? How could they be brought more to the limelight to enable transparency of studies?

Keywords: Research methodology; Mixed methods; Qualitative research; Quantitative research; Case study; Ethnography; Interviews; Surveys; Experiments, Triangulation, Analytical rigor, Methodological rigor; Meta-analysis; Interdisciplinary research; Methodological innovation; Equivalence; Reliability; Transparency; Replicability; Trustworthiness; Philosophy of science.

9. Emerging markets and emerging market MNEs

Track Co-Chairs:
Ishtiaq Pasha Mahmood, National University of Singapore (NUS), pasha.mahmood@nus.edu.sg
Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez, Universidad EAFIT, mgonza40@eafit.edu.co

Research on non-market strategies, new business models, multi-stakeholder partnerships, collaborations between multinational companies from developed economies and developing markets, climate change adaptation, supply chain disruption, geopolitical competition, food and fertilizers scarcity, New Global Deal, debt, are just a few of the IB challenges that this track is open to exploring. We welcome studies that examine trends in foreign direct investment, internationalization and other strategies, the dynamic capabilities of emerging markets firms. We welcome submissions focused on these firms’ transformations from a culture of incremental innovation to a culture of breakthrough innovation given the rising role of EMNEs and the born global firms in the growth of developing economies. Papers that examine understudied emerging markets, such as those in Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Central Asia or Latin America and the Caribbean, are especially appreciated. We also encourage theoretical studies that can further this line of thinking or that help us better understand how significant global crises affect emerging markets firm and how they react to them.

Keywords: Emerging markets; Emerging market opportunities; Transition economies; Capitalism; Socialism; Colonialism; Economic development; Comparative and competitive advantages; Emerging market institutional environment; Foreign versus indigenous MNEs; State-owned enterprises in emerging markets; Family conglomerates; Privatization; Emerging market firm; Theory of EMNE; Internationalization of EMNEs; EMNEs’ diversity and inclusion strategies; EMNEs and sustainable development; EMNEs and climate change; EMNEs and global risk; VUCA.

10. MNE state relations and international business policy

Track Co-Chairs:
Elizabeth Moore, Northeastern University, e.moore@northeastern.edu
Erzsebet Czako, Corvinus University of Budapest, erzsebet.czako@uni-corvinus.hu

What is the role of firms in politics, government and society? With political systems and ideologies in flux, populism on the rise, trade deals being altered or discarded, and geopolitical tensions intensifying, there is a pressing need to understand how to mitigate and navigate social, political and economic disruptions. This reality has given rise to complex political, social, and business challenges, and has brought into question not only how MNEs are impacted by domestic and global uncertainty, but what role they play in shaping policies targeted to alleviate and manage it. What strategies and tactics can MNEs adopt to manage social and political challenges and achieve competitive advantage? How can nonmarket strategies enable MNEs to better manage complex nonmarket and geopolitical risks? What are innovative business approaches to environmental and social challenges, especially in vulnerable areas? In some cases, MNEs are engaged in social and political issues such as navigating climate change agreements or addressing global migration. In other cases, businesses can help to find solutions to social, economic, or political tensions. This track invites empirical, conceptual, and theoretical papers that address these issues and increase understanding on the role of the firm in politics, government, and society. Contributions that guide scholars and practitioners to gain actionable knowledge for managers are also welcome.

Keywords: Institutions; Institutional environment; Institutional voids; Institutional disruptions; Institutional change; Government; Political environment; Legal environment; International business policy; Nonmarket strategy; Corporate Social Responsibility; Corporate Political Activity; Political strategies; Corporate diplomacy; Social sustainability; Supranational governance; Regional integration; Trade agreements; Trade disputes; Uncertainty; Volatility; Social license; Country risk; Political risk; Disaster risk; Societal impact; Social movements; Rule of law; Law; Regulation; Government intervention; Protectionism; Trade barriers; Foreign trade zone; Subsidies and incentives; Public policy; Global governance; Instability; Migration; Poverty; Protectionism; Stakeholders; US-China rivalry; Geopolitics; Hegemonic stability; Resilience.

11. Sustainability in international business

Track Co-Chairs:
Axèle Giroud, University of Manchester, axele.giroud@manchester.ac.uk
Anne Jacqueminet, Bocconi University, anne.jacqueminet@unibocconi.it

Sustainability is integral to global economic development and to firms’ international business engagement (i.e., operations, behavior and interaction with stakeholders). International firms are key societal actors and called on to consider and contribute to the sustainable development challenge in their decisions and actions. Thus, sustainable grand challenges such as climate change, biodiversity depletion, poverty or inequality are crucial “Global Disruptions” affecting international business. Multinational enterprises have taken up the challenge, though progress has been slow. This may be partly due to the managerial difficulties of balancing shareholder interests and stakeholder needs, limited commitment to sustainability, and limited resources to address the promise-performance gap.

This track invites empirical, conceptual, and theoretical research that addresses sustainability issues and increases understanding on how international business shapes and is shaped by environmental and societal challenges. The track welcomes papers that explore firms’ engagement in sustainability including, but not limited to: reducing carbon footprint; better use of resources throughout the value chains; managing and engaging employees to create a sustainable business; stakeholder engagement; climate change: performance monitoring; addressing wicked problems; adopting circular economy techniques; implementing latest digital technologies; achieving United Nations’ Sustainable Development goals; addressing inequalities and engaging in social innovation working with national and international policies. The track also welcomes papers that explore the limits of firm’s actions to tackle global sustainability challenges as well as the role of firm’s national and international stakeholders in the sustainability transition. Contributions that guide scholars to navigate sustainability research to gain actionable knowledge for managers are also welcome.

Keywords: Sustainability development goals (SDGs); Sustainable global value chains (GVCs); Responsible Business; Corporate social responsibility (CSR); Wicked problems; Business ethics; Value co-creation, Stakeholders; Sustainable human resources; Circular economy; Digital sustainability; Environmental sustainability; Green development; Pollution; Climate change, Social and/or Environmental Externalities; Energy Transition; Inequality; Social welfare; Social innovation, Social Entrepreneurship; and Human Rights.

12. Knowledge, innovation, and technology

Track Co-Chairs:
Minyoung Kim, University of Kansas, mkim@ku.edu
Felipe Monteiro, INSEAD, felipe.monteiro@insead.edu

Knowledge is for many firms one of the most important sources of competitive advantage and managing knowledge globally is becoming more complex in this new phase of globalization. This track addresses how knowledge is created, transferred, assimilated, transformed and used internationally. This can occur through the processes of innovation, learning, research and development (R&D), etc. The track will explore how MNEs and internationalizing firms learn, manage knowledge and innovate, and how MNEs orchestrate local knowledge globally to gain and sustain competitive advantage on a global scale. Some examples of topics of interest include: Why do global and local networks of innovation interact? How do firms manage cross-national systems of open innovation for the benefit of all partners in a collaborative innovation initiative? Which governance mechanisms are most conducive to knowledge development? How do MNEs transfer knowledge and organizational practices across borders during a changing global geography of innovation? How do firms manage knowledge acquisition and sharing across emerging economies? How do firms create and appropriate value through global innovation? We especially welcome studies that address global knowledge management issues in the context of diverse and challenging global and local environments.

Keywords: Absorptive capacity; Appropriability regimes; Boundary spanning; Centers of excellence; Exploration vs. exploitation; Digitalization; Global and local knowledge; Global open innovation; Innovation clusters; Knowledge search; Knowledge acquisition; Knowledge creation; Knowledge orchestration; Knowledge governance mechanisms; Knowledge sourcing; Knowledge sharing; Knowledge transfer; Learning across borders; Learning alliances; Licensing; National and regional innovation systems; Networks for innovation; Organizational learning in MNCs; Reverse knowledge transfer; Replication and imitation; R&D outsourcing; R&D offshoring; R&D subsidiaries; Technology management; Technology scouting; Uncertainty; University-MNC relationships; Value creation and value appropriation.

13. Local track: Growth perspectives of CEE region in times of disruption

Track Co-Chairs:
Andreja Jaklič, University of Ljubljana, Andreja.Jaklic@fdv.uni-lj.si
Małgorzata Stefania Lewandowska, SGH Warsaw School of Economics, mlewando@sgh.waw.pl

The region of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) has undergone unprecedented development since the early 1990s, becoming one of the most sought-after investment locations in the world, closing the economic gap with Western Europe and contributing to a significant improvement in local living standards. All of CEE ‘s economies have suffered greatly from the Covid 19 epidemic, which has underscored the need for swift action to return the region to its former economic trajectory. The outbreak of the Covid epidemic was followed by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, an unprecedented challenge that has led to increased migration, looming food, energy, and financial crises, and heightened geopolitical and geo-economic tensions.

At the same time, deep recessions have paved the way for large-scale policy interventions and new opportunities for collaboration between businesses and governments. If properly targeted, this could steer the economic growth of countries from CEE in a more sustainable, climate-friendly direction. These complex and parallel developments raise a number of difficult questions for growth strategies, whether at the macro, mezzo, or micro levels.

Specifically:

  • The contribution of the economies of CEE (traditionally affected by conflict but underrepresented in politics and diplomacy) to the new world order/peacebuilding/stability;
  • The impact of the war in Ukraine on European politics and economics;
  • The developments in EU geopolitics and regional integration and their implications for the economy and the restructuring of global value chains;
  • The expected impact (regional and global) of the current situation on foreign direct investment from and to the region;
  • The role of governments (CEE) in helping companies build visible, flexible, and sustainable supply chains that are resilient to unexpected disruptions;
  • The impact of investments from resilience plans and projects on the business environment and growth prospects;
  • The impact of global value chains disruption on CEE companies’ responses, performance, and strategies to overcome crises (permanent and new) and the development of foreign subsidiaries;
  • The impact of economic sanctions and corporate responses to them and finally, the possible ways in which CEE companies and foreign affiliates develop resilience in the region CEE.

Original research that offers insights into the region’s CEE growth prospects in times of disruption is welcome in this area.

Keywords: Big powers; Resilience; Business sanctions; Sustainability; Regional integration; GVC; FDI; Sustainable value chains; Firms’ resilience strategy.

14. Conference track: International Business Resilience under Global Disruptions

Track Co-Chairs:
Pavida Pananond, Thammasat University, pavida@tbs.tu.ac.th
Kazuhiro Asakawa, Keio University, asakawa@kbs.keio.ac.jp

International business is affected by various aspects of global disruptions, such as pandemic, war, financial crisis and climate change. Resilience may not be the same for all parties concerned, and reactions to resilience may lead to further disruptions to the established orders of geo-economics and geo-politics. How do firms, managers and policy makers cope with such global disruptions? What kind of role does resilience play to cope with them? How do different actors reconcile different meanings of resilience? Do managers and policy makers in advanced economies view resilience in the same way as their emerging-market counterparts do? How do measures that bring resilience to lead firms in global value chains affect other chain participants? This track welcomes submissions related to resilience of firms, managers, and policy makers to cope with various aspects of global disruptions. Disruptions range from the geo-political tensions, shrinking international trade and sales, changes in consumer behavior, global value chain disruption, disruption in global innovation and knowledge sourcing, disruption in human resource mobility and employment, and financial disruption, among others. This track welcomes submissions that seek to advance our knowledge about the complexity of resilience that is needed to respond to all kinds of global disruptions.

Keywords: International business resilience; Global disruptions; Covid-19 pandemic; War; Geopolitical and geoeconomical tensions; Economic nationalism; Technological rivalry; Cyber attack; Terrorism; Climate change; Financial crisis; Global value chain restructure; Relocation of economic activities; Redefinitions of competitive advantage; Barriers to international knowledge transfer; Barriers to human resource mobility; Changes in consumer behavior.

Submitting Your Work

All submissions must be made through AIB’s online submission system, which will open October 15, 2022. Please refer to the AIB 2023 Submission Guide for information on how to prepare and submit your work.